Posts Tagged ‘acting’

Quote of the day: ACTING

July 12, 2015

ACTING

Your life will change, and you will get used to it. And you will be by turns happy, and delighted, and employed, and then you’ll wonder “what the hell happened?” every once in a while. Because the natural state of an actor is to observe life around them, and now you have to figure out how to do that when all anybody’s looking at is you.

–Harrison Ford, speaking to the young cast of Stars War: The Force Awakens

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Quote of the day: ACTING

March 6, 2015

ACTING

I’ll tell you, all the film and television things—you do them, and everyone gets so excited about them, and then they disappear so fast. Whereas I’m always amazed about the shelf life of a theatre piece. {Edward Albee’s] The Goat was on Broadway, the longest run I had ever done, I think it was seven months, and 600,000 people saw that. That’s a bad night for a movie or a TV show, where if you get 10 million, that’s a disappointment. But people always come up to talk to me about [Edward Albee’s] The Goat, and that TV show I did shortly before? Twelve years later, no one has mentioned it. The theatre has more staying power than you think. Maybe it’s a smaller pool of people, but the integrity of the experience stays with them.

— Bill Pullman
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Quote of the day: ACTING

August 17, 2011


ACTING

In Coming Up Roses, an indie feature premiering at the Woodstock Film Festival in September, [Bernadette Peters] plays a former musical actress, the disturbed mother of two girls who find that singing show tunes to lift the spirits doesn’t always work. “Yes, another light part,” Peters says, sounding mystified, or amused, by her choice. “And do you know what I had to do one day? I had to find a way to hit my 15-year-old daughter.” (The actress playing the role was 19.) “I mean really smack her around. I’ve never hit anyone in my life! After I did it, I felt like I was having a heart attack for a week.” For a second it seems she may have one again, but instead the moment resolves in a giggle. “Isn’t it a strange profession? When you have to look for something like that within yourself, it’s scary. And what’s also scary,” she adds, touching the moon at her throat, “is that you find it.”

— Jesse Green, New York magazine

Quote of the day: ACTING

April 27, 2010

ACTING

I think the problem for a lot of stage acting is that it’s so often concerned with the actor’s desire to make sure that he or she is connecting with the audience. So, there’s always this little thing, this patronizing thing, that they are always one little second ahead of the audience telling them what they should feel and what is coming next. I don’t want performers to be responsible for this. This should be the responsibility of the piece as whole, it’s not down to individual performers.

So the ego of the performer has to push to the back?

In some ways, in other ways it’s pure narcissism. you have to have a certain kind of narcissism because you have to trust that the audience will watch whatever you do. A lot of actors have egoism, but they don’t have this kind of narcissism. Maybe the egoism comes from film, where the actors always want to make sure that they are doing something important — this is so different from the narcissist, who simply doesn’t care.

— Elizabeth LeCompte, interviewed by Andrew Quick in The Wooster Group Work Book

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