Quote of the day: THINK

November 16, 2017

THINK

Think in ways you’ve never thought before.
If the phone rings, think of it as carrying a message
Larger than anything you’ve ever heard,
Vaster than a hundred lines of Yeats.

Think that someone may bring a bear to your door,
Maybe wounded and deranged; or think that a moose
Has risen out of the lake, and he’s carrying on his antlers
A child of your own whom you’ve never seen.

When someone knocks on the door, think that he’s about
To give you something large: tell you you’re forgiven,
Or that it’s not necessary to work all the time, or that it’s
Been decided that if you lie down no one will die.

–Robert Bly, “Things to Think”


Quote of the day: BROTHERS

November 12, 2017

BROTHERS

When his brother and sister, Hunter and Ashley, stood up to give their eulogies [for Beau Biden, who died of brain cancer in 2014 at age 46], I don’t know how they did it, but I’ve never been prouder of them in my life. Hunter, who’s a beautiful writer, said: “My first memory of Beau was when I was 3 years old.” They were in the hospital [following the death of their mother and baby sister in a car accident]. Hunt had a skull fracture, almost every bone in his body was broken. And Beau, just 4, in the next bed, held his hand and kept saying: “Hunt, I love you. Look at me. I love you, I love you, I love you.” At the funeral Hunt said in 42 years that “he has never stopped holding my hand.”

I want readers to know that there are people like Beau in this world.

–Joe Biden, interviewed by Philip Galanes on the occasion of publishing his memoir Promise Me, Dad

                   Joe Biden with his sons Hunter, left, and Beau, in the early 1970s.


Quote of the day: GROWTH

November 6, 2017

GROWTH

Some periods of our growth are so confusing that we don’t even recognize that growth is happening. We may feel hostile or angry or weepy and hysterical, or we may feel depressed. It would never occur to us, unless we stumbled on a book or a person who explained to us, that we were in fact in the process of change, of actually becoming larger, spiritually, than we were before. Whenever we grow, we tend to feel it, as a young seed must feel the weight and inertia of the earth as it seeks to break out of its shell on its way to becoming a plant. Often the feeling is anything but pleasant. But what is most unpleasant is the not knowing what is happening. Those long periods when something inside ourselves seems to be waiting, holding its breath, unsure about what the next step should be, eventually become the periods we wait for, for it is in those periods that we realize that we are being prepared for the next phase of our life and that, in all probability, a new level of the personality is about to be revealed.

–Alice Walker, Living By the Word


Photo diary: weekend in Vermont, October 2017

November 2, 2017

(click photos to enlarge)

The weekend began with a lovely road trip through New England. We stopped for lunch at an unlikely Polish deli outside Springfield, MA: kielbasa, pierogis, sauerkraut.

Our destination: Song Soul Farm on many acres outside Chester, VT, home to Kate and Jeff, college friends of Andy’s, who raise apple and pear trees, chickens, guinea fowl, three cats, and a herd of nine llamas. Llamas are dazzling creatures to be around. The guest cottage we stayed in sits right in the middle of their pasture, so all day long they promenaded back and forth, sometimes grazing on the lawn right outside the house where I sat reading.

Walking in the woods on a crisp autumn day meant encountering beautiful colors and an ancient weathered cabin.

Kate and Jeff are a delightful, smart, eccentric couple with a beautiful rambling farmhouse and a passion for pressing apples into cider, mowing fields, marshalling tractors for apple harvesting, and teaching city slickers how to feed llamas by hand.

 

 


Quote of the day: UNIQUE

October 20, 2017

UNIQUE

So much time has gone by! Napoleon’s house—
He never came—still stands in the Quarter.
Time ends all the good living that
Louis the Sixteenth, after the trouble, never
Experienced, all the sights Andrew
Jackson never saw in Pirate’s Alley.
Ask the alligators about heat and history.

Out in the bayous we met a small alligator
Named Elvis. When we stroked his throat, he waved
His left claw at the world. It makes you think.
Alligators enjoy a world before the alphabet.

I don’t want to be who you are! I want
To be myself, someone playing with language.
Let us each be a sensualist
Of the imponderable! Let’s each do
What we want. I thread my way
Down alphabets to the place where Elvis is.

–Robert Bly, “The Day We Visited New Orleans”


%d bloggers like this: